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Many experts say the rise of embedded and wearable computing will bring the next revolution in digital technology. Most of our devices will be communicating on our behalf—they will be interacting with the physical and virtual worlds more than interacting with us. The devices are going to disappear into what we wear and/or carry. For example, the glasses interface will shrink to near-invisibility in conventional glasses. The devices will also become robustly inter-networked (remember the first conversations about body networks of a decade ago?). The biggest shift is a strong move away from a single do-everything device to multiple devices with overlapping functions and, above all, an inter-relationship with our other devices. There will be absolutely no privacy, not even in the jungle, away from civilization. I don’t like this, but people have shown over and over again that they are willing to trade away their souls for a ‘$1 off’ coupon. Conversation, which includes not only words, but also movement, eye contact, hearing, memory and more, is such a holistic, pleasurable experience that people will not give it up easily.

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Recent debates regarding the primacy of social interaction versus individual cognition appear to be caused by the lack of an integrative account of the multiple scales at play. We suggest that reconciling individual autonomy and dyadic interactive viewpoints requires the taking into account of different time scales (e.g. development, learning) and levels of organization (e.g. genetic, neural, behavioral, social). We argue that this challenge requires the joint development of tools for two-body and second person neuroscience, along with the theoretical concepts and methods of coordination dynamics and systems biology. Such a research program may be particularly fruitful in deciphering complex socio-developmental diseases that are known to involve alterations on multiple levels.

Social interaction challenges the boundaries between the field of cognitive science and how to divide observations across distinct time scales and organizational levels. Social neuroscience is taking up this challenge at both theoretical and methodological levels. Here we have argued that three major dimensions are of potential significance: integrating a developmental perspective, investigating real-time social interaction with a two-body or second person neuroscience, and adopting a multi-scale approach through complex systems’ perspectives, in particular the concepts, methods and tools of coordination dynamics. These developments have already begun and should help further an understanding of disorders of social interaction such as autism.

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This issue of Interface aims to make a contribution to the ongoing politics of knowledge of those marginalized, made illegible and spoken-over by the contemporary geopolitics of capitalist coloniality. It engages with the rich heritages of popular pedagogical practices, subaltern philosophies and critical theorisations by entering into dialogue with the experiences, projects and practices of social movements who are at the forefront of developing a new emancipatory politics of knowledge for the 21st century.

In this introduction we situate historically, politically and theoretically the centrality of the pedagogical in both the learning of hegemonic forms of life, social relationships and subjectivities but also in practices of unlearning these and learning new ones. We identify the general themes that emerge from the rich cornucopia of experiences discussed in the issue as a contribution to the mapping and nurturing of the ecology of counter-politics of knowledges flourishing across the globe.

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The new socio-technological systems of the internet involve complex collaborative behaviors, of which Wikis in general are a particular successful case, and especially Wikipedia. This encyclopedia has created and harnessed new social and work dynamics, which can provide insight into specific aspects of cognition, as amplified by a multitude of editors and their ping-pong style of editing, spatial and time flexibility within unique technology-community fostering features. Wikipedia’s motto “The Free Encyclopedia That Anyone Can Edit” is analyzed to reveal human, technological and value actors within a theoretical context of distributed cognition, cooperation and technological agency. As this work is part of an emergent field of Wiki Studies, with an interdisciplinary approach, three avenues of inquiry are used to research cooperation and cognition in Wikipedia articles. These studies contribute to constructing an ecology of the article, a vision of humanities bottom-up, and a better understanding of cooperation and cognition within socio-technological networks.

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Every day we are bombarded with messages apparently telling us what to do or not to do, what to believe or not to believe. Some messages we just ignore, some we unreflectively obey and some we unreflectively reject. Others we might think about and question, asking ‘why should I do, or refrain from doing that?’, or ‘why should I believe that, or not believe it?’. We are frequently confronted with arguments: these are attempts to persuade us – to influence our beliefs and actions – by giving us reasons to believe this or that, or to act in this way or that. This book will equip you with concepts and techniques used in the identification, analysis and assessment of arguments. The aim is to improve your ability to tell whether an argument is being given, exactly what the argument is, and whether you ought to be persuaded by it. Each chapter concludes with a chapter summary and exercises; answers to selected exercises are at the end of the text. Where appropriate, the reader is encouraged to look outside the book for further examples to serve as exercises.

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How do social researchers know how to select the action research (AR) approach that is most appropriate for their study? Aimed at providing newcomers to AR with the different approaches they seek, Action Research introduces the history, philosophy, social change agenda, methodologies, ethical arguments for, and fieldwork tools of AR. The book opens with a brief presentation of two cases of AR. This is followed by chapter on the philosophical and methodological arguments for AR as a form of scientific inquiry that better meets scientific standards than what is currently called “social science” in academia. The authors next explore the marginalization of AR activities in academia, followed by four cases drawn from the authors own practice, including some examples of failures. Two new chapters engage the student and researcher into the current debates on action research as “tradition” or its own “methodology“, and how action research takes shape in the university environment. In the final section of the book the authors cover six different approaches to doing AR. Throughout the book, the authors employ a consistent AR praxis supported by suitable methods and tools to integrate a philosophical, methodological, and political economic position to view the different kinds of AR practices. Action Research provides experienced researchers and practitioners with more appropriate and productive ways of using AR for conducting social research.

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While in the United States and Europe, guaranteeing minimum incomes is still taboo, such incomes were initiated as “Oportunidades” in Mexico and “Bolsa Familia” in Brazil. These direct or conditional cash payments (CCTs) brought millions out of poverty. Entrepreneurs Paul Polak and Mal Warwick recount many successes in addressing poverty worldwide in their The Business Solution to Poverty, while Amy Cortese cites the rebirth of local business models in Locavesting. A longer historical view by Princeton economist Angus Deaton in “The Great Escape” finds the origins of inequality in the technological revolution as private innovation races ahead of social innovation and economic elites capture political power. The new paradigms in human development are at last emerging into politics and those 1960s visions of abundant post-industrial societies are alive. The move beyond ideologically imposed scarcity regimes and fossil-fueled early industrialism cannot be suppressed much longer, even though establishment economists will certainly try. The Solar Age (see video) is now visible in the advance of green, knowledge-rich economies based on harvesting the free daily photons from the sun, as we track in our Green Transition Scoreboard and daily updates at our “Ethical Markets” website. Our research shows that current $1 trillion annual private investments between now and 2020 will have scaled. As a result, the world will have entered the Solar Age.

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The natural gas boom — driven in large measure by the environmental destructive practice of hydraulic fracturing, or “fracking” — is doing more harm than good. The enormous scale of development, its very rapid pace, and the smoke and noise accompanying it — all defining elements of a “boom” — explain why the balance tips to the negative. The scale is a problem because the most serious health and environmental impacts of fracking are largely due to very intensive development. We have 500,000 gas wells in this country, nearly 3,000 in just one county, and 11 compressor stations belching carcinogenic air emissions in a tiny town of only two square miles (Dish, Texas). Our ecosystems (like our bodies) can absorb a certain amount of abuse and still bounce back. But at a certain point, it’s just too much, and the insults overwhelm the resilience.

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The collapse of Greenland’s lemming population cycle has disastrous consequences for a number of predators. Arctic predators are facing a hungry future. A dramatic collapse in the population of Greenland’s only rodent – the collared lemming – means that the food source for several predators has practically vanished. A recent study, published in the scientific journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B., shows that the dramatic reduction in the number of lemmings may have significant knock-on effects on tropically linked species.